Coping with Performance Anxiety

Performance anxiety is very common – most musicians and music students would report to have suffered from it at some point in their lives. Even very seasoned musician admit to feeling very nervous before performing – for example, Rita Ora, the singer and recording artist, has admitted feeling extremely nervous before going on stage to the point where she feels like throwing up. She said that the only way for her to cope with it is to keep telling herself that she can only be as good as she possibly can and to do her best.

Now is the time of Grade exams and so many students are struggling with nerves.
There are some simple tricks to coping with performance anxiety – for some handy ideas, check out this list from http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/stage-fright-performance-anxiety#1:

stage-fright1

Performance Anxiety Treatments

Here are some tips to help you overcome your fears and shine on stage, on the field, or at the podium:

1. Be prepared: practice, practice, practice.

2. Limit caffeine and sugar intake the day of the performance. Eat a sensible meal a few hours before you are to perform so that you have energy and don’t get hungry. A low-fat meal including complex carbohydrates — whole-grain pasta, lentil soup, yogurt, or a bean and rice burrito — is a good choice.
Shift the focus off of yourself and your fear to the enjoyment you are providing to the spectators. Close your eyes and imagine the audience laughing and cheering, and you feeling good.

3. Don’t focus on what could go wrong. Instead focus on the positive. Visualize your success.

4. Avoid thoughts that produce self-doubt.

5. Practice controlled breathing, meditation, biofeedback, and other strategies to help you relax and redirect your thoughts when they turn negative. It is best to practice some type of relaxation technique every day, regardless of whether you have a performance, so that the skill is there for you when you need it.
Take a walk, jump up and down, shake out your muscles, or do whatever feels right to ease your anxious feelings before the performance.

6. Connect with your audience — smile, make eye contact, and think of them as friends.

7. Act natural and be yourself.

8. Exercise, eat a healthy diet, get adequate sleep, and live a healthy lifestyle.

Keep in mind that stage fright is usually worse before the performance and often goes away once you get started.

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Author: Buna School of Music

New music academy and teacher training centre in Kampala, Uganda. For more information, please see: www.https://bunaschoolofmusic.wordpress.com/

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